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Demographic correlates of college student-parents’ outcomes and stressors: Implications for well-being and intervention

Demographic correlates of college student-parents’ outcomes and stressors: Implications for well-being and intervention by  Justin L. Williams, M.A., Farzana Saleem, B.A.,  & Ciara P. Smalls, Ph.D. Georgia State University

Demographic correlates of college student-parents’ outcomes and stressors: Implications for well-being and intervention

Justin L. Williams, M.A., Farzana Saleem, B.A.,  & Ciara P. Smalls, Ph.D.
Georgia State University

Non-traditional college students can be conceptualized as having one of the following characteristics: delayed entry into college, having dependents, being a single parent, working full-time, being financially independent, attending class part-time, or not having a high school diploma (Choy, 2002).  Based on this definition, about 73 percent of  all college students can be viewed as non-traditional (Choy, 2002). Compared to “traditional” college students, non-traditional students face various challenges, such as having children, that can make successfully completing college difficult (Choy, 2002; Horn & Carroll, 1996; Jacobs & King, 2002).


Author

Justin L. Williams, M.A., Farzana Saleem, B.A.,  & Ciara P. Smalls, Ph.D. Georgia State University Justin L. Williams, M.A., Farzana Saleem, B.A., & Ciara P. Smalls, Ph.D. Georgia State University

Justin L. Williams, M.A., Farzana Saleem, B.A.,  & Ciara P. Smalls, Ph.D.
Georgia State University


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