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Our Journal

"An exchange of ideas, information and resources for community practicioners." Learn more here...

Our Mission

"The Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice is devoted to providing high quality and practical information on community practice." Learn more here...

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Featured Articles from Around the Globe

Exploring Community-Based Advocacy Work Against Human Trafficking in the U.S. Exploring Community-Based Advocacy Work Against Human Trafficking in the U.S.

Jaclyn D. Houston, Charlynn Odahl-Ruan, Mona Shattell (Chicago, IL, USA)

Peer Reviewed

Research on community organizations suggests there are a variety of factors related to the success of an organization’s mission. This study identifies general facilitators and challenges advocates working against human trafficking experience and the strategies utilized to overcome these barriers.

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A Community Psychology Approach to Program Development for Female Juvenile Offenders: A Community-based Arts Initiative A Community Psychology Approach to Program Development for Female Juvenile Offenders: A Community-based Arts Initiative

Anna R. Smith (Hawaii and South Carolina, USA)

Peer Reviewed

This paper explores the benefits of taking a community psychology approach to designing and implementing a program for female juvenile offenders (FJOs). It expounds on some of the gaps in FJO programming and argues that a community psychology approach is useful in addressing these gaps. The highlighted work demonstrates the value of a community psychology approach by describing the process of developing a community-based arts intervention for FJOs participating in a community arbitration program.

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Reducing Stress and Preventing Anxiety in African American Adolescents:  A Culturally-Grounded Approach Reducing Stress and Preventing Anxiety in African American Adolescents: A Culturally-Grounded Approach

W. LaVome Robinson, Jocelyn R. Droege*, Mary H. Case*, Leonard A. Jason (Chicago, IL, USA)

*Not pictured

Peer Reviewed

Evidenced-based and culturally adapted stress-reduction interventions for urban African American adolescents who are at risk for anxiety and other problems related to stress are needed. This study presents intervention components and preliminary outcome findings of a culturally adapted stress-reduction intervention for urban African American adolescents.

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Facilitating community change: The Community Capitals Framework, its relevance to community psychology practice, and its application in a Georgia community Facilitating community change: The Community Capitals Framework, its relevance to community psychology practice, and its application in a Georgia community

Ashley E. Anglin (Morristown, NJ, USA)

Peer Reviewed

This article aims to contribute to the discussion of holistic community development models by presenting and evaluating the Community Capitals Framework (CCF; Flora & Flora, 2004) within the field of community psychology and within a Georgia community. The CCF is a conceptual framework from the field of sociology that includes seven forms of community capital, which can be used to better understand how communities work and thrive.

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featured video

2015 SCRA Biennial Swampscott Video Compilation

2015 SCRA Biennial Swampscott Video Compilation

At the 2015 SCRA biennial, panelists Mo Elias, Regina Langhout, Urmitapa Dutta, and Christopher Sonn presented remarks on the future of our field in global context. This video is a compilation of thoughts about the 1965 Swampscott conference, its US context, and a few remarks on the 1975 Austin conference.

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Editor's Note

Highlighting Practice In Many Ways

The recent SCRA conference, “Celebrating 50 Years of Community Psychology: Bridging Past and Future” was both refreshing and motivating.  It was great to see the diversity of posters and presentations highlighting the work of community psychologists, and the articles in this issue of GJCPP reflect a similar enthusiasm for the practice of community psychology.

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SCRA Mini-Grants Spotlight: WRITE ON

WRITE ON: A Youth-Centered Writing Intervention to Promote Well Being

Edited by Kyrah K. Brown & Jasmine A. Douglas, Editors, SCRA Mini Grants Team

Founded in 2010, the SCRA Community Mini-Grants program supports small, time-sensitive community-based projects that are consistent with SCRA’s mission, principles and goals. We are excited to support the great work being done by SCRA members and their community partners; and we are happy to be able to highlight examples of this work to share with the GJCPP readership. In this spotlight, Chloe Greenbaum shares preliminary findings from an evaluation of a six week writing-based intervention that was piloted in youth detention facilities in New York. 

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THEory into ACTion: A Bulletin of New Developments in Community Psychology Practice

Interview with Helen Louise Azzara, Creative Facilitator with a Master’s degree in Creativity Studies and PhD Candidate at Pacifica Graduate Institute

The Bulletins, initiated by the SCRA Practice Council and produced monthly, are intended to tell the story of community practice. They are typically short pieces devoted to both the experiences, techniques, and reflections of practice. They might include programs addressing a particular issue, an interview with a practitioner, a new tool or technique available, the role of community psychologists in practice, or any number of topics related to our work with communities. Each Bulletin is reviewed and edited by a group of writers within the field of community practice. Please feel free to contact Tabitha Underwood at underwoodtabitha@gmail.com if you are interested in submitting a piece for the Bulletin.

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tools of the trade

Making Collaboration Count: A Tool for Tracking and Building Participation in Community Collaboratives and Coalitions

Evaluation is necessary not only for assessing the impact of programs and interventions, but also for gathering actionable feedback on the ways in which organizations work together. Continuous evaluation of collaboratives themselves can help to address common issues, such as getting the right people at the table, balancing multiple stakeholder priorities, avoiding tokenism, and perhaps most importantly, encouraging participation and maintaining it over time. With the growing interest in collaborative processes over the past several years—and with collaboration and coalition development as a key practice competency identified by the Society for Community Research and Action (2012)—it is necessary to identify new tools that can be used to evaluate coalition processes, promote participation, and to ensure that these groups function in a way that promotes working toward collective goals. This article presents a tool and supporting strategies for tracking and encouraging participation in collaborative processes, as well as a case example illustrating how this tool has been utilized within the North Jersey Health Collaborative. 

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